Great Canadian Heritage Treasure

A fabulous original hand-painted litho of a time when the future looke bright, not only for American indians, but for race relations, and the promise of the United States as a force for tolerance in the world for non-white, non-Christian peoples.

Alas... Even in 1846, when this litho was hand-painted, Currier notes it was "The only treaty that never was broken."

The treatment of American Indians, by the white setters, aided and abetted by their state and national governments, is one of the most sordid in all of human history.

And it was all done in the name of liberty, freedom, and bringing civilization to inferior beings and cultures. Same thing George Bush is bring to Iraq and Afghanistan.

Who says History doesn't repeat on me...

Wm Penn's Treaty with the Indians when he Founded the Province of Penn 1661 - Nathaniel Currier 1846
Orig. hand painted lithograph - Image Size - 23 x 32 cm
Found - Toronto, ON
The George Harlan Estate Coll

Things had started out well enough, between the races, as long as white people were few in number, and feared for their lives, not from Indians, but from the hostile elements in the environment where they had chosen to settle: cold, disease, starvation.

The original inhabitants, the Indians, had shown them the way to survive in many ways, especially during the severe winters.

The Indians also showed them how to trap and became partners in exploiting the furs of the wild interior territories.

Indians were indispensable to the survival and prosperity of the early settlers who made treaties with people they needed, and respected.

As settlers grew more powerful they increasingly encroached on Indian territories and rights.

 

Copyright Goldi Productions Ltd. 1996-1999-2005

 

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Wm Penn's Treaty with the Indians, 1661 - N Currier 1 - 1846

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